Recent Posts

Last year, the Supreme Court vacated the Ninth Circuit’s 2014 ruling that plaintiff Thomas Robins had Article III standing to bring his Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”) action against background check company Spokeo, Inc. The Supreme Court held that the Ninth Circuit had erred in failing to separately determine whether the plaintiff had adequately alleged...

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Podcast: Data Do, Data Don’t

Aug 16, 2017 by Jake Sommer, Jon Frankel, Alexei Klestoff, Anna Hsia, Ken Dreifach, Mason Weisz, Marci Rozen and Jason Wool

Most websites and apps collect information from its users. But are you doing it in a legally-compliant way? We won’t be taking over any New Year’s countdowns, but listen to our radio-ready voices as we describe some best practices on handling user data. Data Do Take Stock – 3:47 Jake Sommer & Jon Frankel It isn’t...

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Joining California and Delaware, Nevada now requires website and online services operators to post a notice detailing their privacy practices. Nevada’s law is set to take effect on October 1, 2017 and is particularly important for operators who are not already in compliance with the Delaware or California laws — both of which are more...

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When an elusive defendant disappeared from Canada amid a trade secrets case, a Canadian trial court, finding itself out of options, turned to Google to try to enforce its orders. The court issued an injunction requiring Google to remove links associated with the defendant from its search results—not only in Canada but worldwide—a decision that...

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Now Accepting Applications for 2018 Fellows

Aug 3, 2017 by Jennifer Russell

ZwillGen, a leading boutique law firm specializing in the intersection of law and technology, is seeking candidates for its 2018 Fellowship Program. The program presents a unique opportunity to work with and learn from some of the most experienced privacy and data security lawyers representing the biggest names in technology. The ZwillGen Fellow position is...

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A three-judge panel of the Ninth Circuit unanimously upheld the facial constitutionality of 18 U.S.C § 2709(c), the statute authorizing the FBI to prevent a recipient of a National Security Letter (NSL) from disclosing the fact that it had received such a demand. Issued without mandatory judicial oversight or a court order, an NSL allows...

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