What Will Be Tech’s Hot Topics in 2018 and Beyond? Our Predictions

Published On January 10, 2018 | By Allison Bender, Nury Siekkinen, Jeff Landis, Ken Dreifach, Zach Lerner and Jason Wool | General, Practical Advice
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Technology is always changing, and the law sometimes struggles to keep pace. This can lead to more questions than answers for organizations trying to make use of innovative or evolving tools, while navigating a legal gray zone in which risks need to be managed with particular care. Fast-paced technological change can also lead to the application of outdated, “analog” laws to high-tech, “digital” issues. At the same time, legal evolutions can trigger changes in technology, or at least the way organizations make use of it. We asked the lawyers here at ZwillGen what changes in technology or the tech law landscape they expect will make the biggest waves in 2018 and beyond. Here are six of our picks for “the next big thing.”

About The Authors

Allison Bender counsels Fortune 50 companies and startups in a range of industries on cybersecurity and privacy matters in the U.S. and internationally. Drawing from her roots in government, national security, and R&D, she helps clients navigate legal issues associated with emerging technologies and aids clients in strategically managing legal, financial, and reputational cybersecurity risks.

Nury's practice focuses on litigating complex commercial cases in federal, state, and bankruptcy courts, including defending companies against class action lawsuits. She has represented clients in matters involving the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (“ECPA”), the Video Privacy Protection Act (“VPPA”), Michigan Video Rental Privacy Act (“VRPA”), the Illinois Biometrics Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”), and state privacy and unfair competition laws. Nury also advises clients on matters related to overseas litigation and foreign criminal investigations.

Jeff’s practice focuses on representing clients in litigation and government investigations, with a particular focus on defending companies in complex class action lawsuits. He also assists clients in responding to formal investigations and informal inquiries conducted by the FTC, DOJ and states’ Attorney General Offices. Jeff has extensive experience in all aspects of civil litigation, including serving as trial counsel for both plaintiffs and defendants in matters pending before judges, juries, and arbitration panels.

Ken counsels clients on complex issues involving information privacy and data law, online liability, consumer regulatory and gaming law, including regulatory response, and adherence to self-regulatory guidelines for online advertising. Ken has had more than twenty years of experience in high-profile regulatory, in-house and private practice roles, including as Chief of the New York Attorney General’s Internet Bureau. He is one of the nation’s leading authorities on the relationship between emerging advertising technologies and online privacy.

Zach Lerner’s practice focuses on a variety of legal matters impacting Internet-based companies. He helps companies in a wide range of industries including education technology, financial technology, unmanned aerial vehicles, and fantasy sports with issues related to privacy, e-commerce, and advertising.

Jason Wool’s practice focuses on cybersecurity, including cyber risk management, incident response, and compliance with global data protection laws, regulations, and standards, including the PCI-DSS. He has advised organizations ranging from small businesses to Fortune 500 companies during complex, privileged computer crime investigations; provided ongoing advice on the development of cybersecurity programs and cybersecurity governance structures; conducted tabletop exercises and other data breach simulations; and assisted clients with large scale audits to determine compliance with complex cybersecurity standards.

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