Like most things these days the online book market is rapidly growing and eclipsing the non-digital market. With that in mind Senator Leland Yee from California recently introduced legislation to put stronger privacy protections in place to restrict disclosure of records about consumer activity on e-book sites.  While the legislation would provide more protection for...

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As an update to our previous post regarding the United States Copyright Group (USCG) mass copyright infringement suits, Judge Beryl A. Howell of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, ruled in three additional USCG cases (Call of the Wild Movie LLC v. Does 1-1,062, Maverick Entertainment Group, Inc. v. Does 1...

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Google settles FTC case involving Google Buzz

March 30, 2011 | 0 Comments

Today, Google Inc. has agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that it used deceptive tactics and violated its own privacy promises to consumers when it launched its social network, Google Buzz, in 2010. A copy of the FTC press release can be found here.    According to the FTC, this settlement is unique in two...

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Daily Digest – March 29, 2011

March 29, 2011 | 0 Comments

* A new McAfee/SAIC study indicates that cybercriminals are shifting their efforts to target sensitive corporate information instead of credit card and other personal information. A quarter of the companies surveyed for the study reported that data breaches delayed new product rollouts or M&A activities. * Attorney General Martha Coakley announced that the Briar Group,...

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RSA Victim of Sophisticated Cyberattack

March 24, 2011 | 0 Comments

On March 17, 2011, RSA (the maker of SecurID token hardware and software-based solutions) announced it had been the victim of “an extremely sophisticated cyber attack…” According to the announcement, information “related to RSA’s SecurID two-factor authentication products” was among the information compromised during the attack, though the company stated they did not believe the...

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On Friday, March 11, the District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia issued a ruling in a case involving access to Twitter user data as part of the government’s investigation of the Wikileaks/Bradley Manning case.  While the Wikileaks investigation is newsworthy in its own right, it is also generating some interesting court rulings on...

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Cal. Civil Code § 1747.08, which is part of the Song-Beverly Credit Card Act of 1971 (as amended), prohibits entities that accept credit cards from asking or requiring cardholders to provide “personal identification information” at the time of a credit card transaction if the personal identification information is then recorded by the entity. “Personal identification...

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The Conference featured in-depth discussions with leading Internet policy experts and panel tracks focusing on privacy/security, telecommunications regulation, intellectual property and innovation. Marc lent his expertise on a panel discussing: DOJ Surveillance Blueprints: A CALEAmity for the U.S. Technology Industry? To hear the full discussion of the panel please click here....

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Recently the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a district court’s decision stating that a commonplace phone that texts and makes calls can be considered a computer as defined by 18 U.S.C. § 1030(e)(1). In USA v. Kramer the court  applied a two level enhancement on the defendant’s sentence for transporting a minor in interstate...

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Marc Zwillinger was quoted in a recent Bloomberg Article discussing WikiLeaks fight to block the U.S. from reviewing Twitter account data based on an argument that the government’s demands violate their constitutional rights.  Zwillinger explained that the Fourth Amendment typically wouldn’t protect “transactional information” related to communications, such as dialed phone numbers or IP addresses. ...

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